O. J. Simpson murder case: O. J. Simpson is acquitted of the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman.

The People of the State of California v. Orenthal James Simpson was a criminal trial in Los Angeles County Superior Court in which former National Football League (NFL) player, broadcaster and actor O. J. Simpson was tried and acquitted for the murders of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman. The pair were stabbed to death outside Brown's condominium in the Brentwood neighborhood of Los Angeles on the night of June 12, 1994. The trial spanned eleven months, from the jury's swearing-in on November 9, 1994. Opening statements were made on January 24, 1995, and Simpson was acquitted of both counts of murder on October 3 of the same year, despite overwhelming forensic evidence against him. The trial came shortly after the 1992 Los Angeles riots, and it is agreed that, controversially, the defense capitalised on the anger among the city’s African-American community towards police to convince the majority-Black jury to acquit Simpson. The trial is often characterized as the trial of the century because of its international publicity, and has been described as the "most publicized" criminal trial in human history.

O. J. Simpson murder case: O. J. Simpson is acquitted of the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman.

October 3, 1995

The People of the State of California v. Orenthal James Simpson was a criminal trial in Los Angeles County Superior Court in which former National Football League (NFL) player, broadcaster and actor O. J. Simpson was tried and acquitted for the murders of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman. The pair were stabbed to death outside Brown's condominium in the Brentwood neighborhood of Los Angeles on the night of June 12, 1994. The trial spanned eleven months, from the jury's swearing-in on November 9, 1994. Opening statements were made on January 24, 1995, and Simpson was acquitted of both counts of murder on October 3 of the same year, despite overwhelming forensic evidence against him. The trial came shortly after the 1992 Los Angeles riots, and it is agreed that, controversially, the defense capitalised on the anger among the city’s African-American community towards police to convince the majority-Black jury to acquit Simpson. The trial is often characterized as the trial of the century because of its international publicity, and has been described as the "most publicized" criminal trial in human history.